Categories
Bullying Hate Crime Racism

Struggling With Stereotype Based Bullying?

Children are often put under pressure to think and behave in certain ways that define them and this in turn can lead to bullying. Read Lois Mosquera’s top tips to help combat bullying due to stereotypes.

In various settings, particularly at school and home, children are often put under pressure to think and behave in certain ways that define them as ‘masculine’ or ‘feminine’. Or they are from different cultures that look at things different from what is considered ‘normal’.

Over one-third of children have witnessed racism at schools before they are 13, while Chinese students in the UK are reporting increased racism and discrimination since the Coronavirus pandemic began.

This can lead to bullying in that people with strict ways of thinking and behaving may not have the tolerance and acceptance to welcome people who do not behave in ‘typical’ ways.


Top tips to help combat bullying due to stereotypes:

Ask why someone who is bullying holds stereotypes

Every moment is an educational opportunity. By encouraging open, non-judgemental conversations about this issue, you can have a massive positive impact and help to eradicate this issue.

Be a role model and educator

By modelling behaviours and ways of thinking that are accepting of all regardless of stereotypes, you are contributing towards eradicating bullying because of it. This is especially important to teachers and parents as they are often the most influential people in the lives of children and adolescents.

Talk regularly and specifically with people about issues with stereotypes.

This is especially important for teachers and parents. Let them know that they can come to you for an open conversation about this issue and that they will not be judged if they do hold stereotypical views.

Don’t under-react to bullying just because it is due to stereotypes.

As gender stereotypes are so common, comments like ‘You throw like a girl’, ‘Crying is for girls’ and ‘Why are you acting gay?’ are often just brushed under the carpet and dismissed as being playful. It is important to never underestimate the adverse impacts that such comments can have on an individual’s social, emotional, and academic welfare.

All bullying is serious no matter how playful insults may be perceived to be. This is especially important if people are bullying you based on stereotypes.

Even if the stereotypes are not offensive to yourself, and you do not class them as bullying, it is still important to react appropriately and challenge such views.

If you need support on any bullying issues, join our community here.

RSS FORUM CHATS

  • Coming out
    Hi I am bisexual and I am scared about coming out to my parents if anyone has suggestions that would be great!😄
  • How to increase my self esteem
    Hi! I'm Apples101 and I don't know what's wrong with me but sometimes I get suddenly sad and start thinking I'm ugly and that I don't belong in this world, I've tried asking my closet friends for help and whenever they try to help me by either saying that I'm not ugly or that I […]
  • Can my brother recover?
    Can my brother recover,he doesnt recognize us and dont know what happening in our world,like he is back from an infant stage,,can somebody help ,I need honest answer thanks.
  • LGBTQ+ and relationships
    Hi everyone, I made this for people who struggle with their sexuality, relationships etc and to help people be themselves and love themselves!
  • I M(17) get continuously ridiculed by 2 of my friends
    We met almost 3 years ago through school and from that time the bullying had started. I didn't used to think at the time that it was bullying and as time progressed it only got worse sometimes I would be getting hit on the name of fun this has been happening till today. Now that […]
  • Questioning.
    Hi, i've been questioning my sexuality for 3 years. In 2018 i thought i was bi because i liked a girl i met online, as the time went by i started to loose the feelings and later i identified as straight. I tought it was just a little crush/phase. This year i started to question […]